Woodbridge on Alert for Emerald Ash Borer | Patch

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Woodbridge, NJ - It's about the size of a cooked grain of rice, and it's causing havoc in certain New Jersey towns.

We're talking about the Emerald Ash Borer, an invasive species of beetle that is responsible for wiping out entire groves of trees, specifically ash trees, where it breeds. Woodbridge has been warned by the state to be on the lookout for signs of the bug, a township spokesman told Patch.

"We have not seen any sign of the Emerald," said Woodbridge spokesman John Hagerty. "But our Department of Parks has received information from the State Department of Agriculture, and if we run across this issue, we are required to contact them."

"Parks crews are inspecting trees at our various parks and neighborhoods on a regular basis," he added.

The Emerald Ash Borer was most recently reported in Moorestown, New Jersey in November, 2015. In March of this year, officials there released a dire prediction: In the next 5-8 years, all ash trees in Moorestown may be dead because of the beetle.

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Woodbridge, New Jersey, United States40.17°N 74.5°W0.334Yes
Michigan, United States41.77°N 84.65°W0.296No
Moorestown Township, New Jersey, United States39.97°N 74.94°W0.215No
Hillsdale, New Jersey, United States41°N 74.04°W0.110No
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Woodbridge on Alert for Emerald Ash Borer | Patch
Original text (summary): 

Woodbridge, NJ - It's about the size of a cooked grain of rice, and it's causing havoc in certain New Jersey towns.

We're talking about the Emerald Ash Borer, an invasive species of beetle that is responsible for wiping out entire groves of trees, specifically ash trees, where it breeds. Woodbridge has been warned by the state to be on the lookout for signs of the bug, a township spokesman told Patch.

"We have not seen any sign of the Emerald," said Woodbridge spokesman John Hagerty. "But our Department of Parks has received information from the State Department of Agriculture, and if we run across this issue, we are required to contact them."

"Parks crews are inspecting trees at our various parks and neighborhoods on a regular basis," he added.

The Emerald Ash Borer was most recently reported in Moorestown, New Jersey in November, 2015. In March of this year, officials there released a dire prediction: In the next 5-8 years, all ash trees in Moorestown may be dead because of the beetle.

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Emerald ash borer in the USA 2015-16ongoing2016-02-26
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