Whirling disease found in commercial fish hatchery in Alberta

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Colette Derworiz
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A case of whirling disease, which affects fish such as trout, has now been detected outside of Banff National Park.

Last week, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency confirmed whirling disease in a "commercial aquaculture facility licensed by the Government of Alberta."

No one from Alberta Environment and Parks has been available for comment yet this week, but commercial aquaculture facilities include fish hatcheries and trout ponds.

It's a $10 million industry in Alberta, according to a provincial government website.

Whirling disease — named after the circular swimming patterns of infected fish — was first confirmed in Johnson Lake in Banff National Park in August after a Parks Canada veterinarian saw a fish exhibiting symptoms earlier this year.

Since then, it has also been found in several locations in the Bow River in Banff National Park and now in what's believed to be a private fish hatchery.

Lesley Peterson, a fisheries biologist with Trout Unlimited, said it's concerning.

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Canada52.28°N 117.47°W0.478Yes
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Whirling disease found in commercial fish hatchery in Alberta
Original text (summary): 

A case of whirling disease, which affects fish such as trout, has now been detected outside of Banff National Park.

Last week, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency confirmed whirling disease in a "commercial aquaculture facility licensed by the Government of Alberta."

No one from Alberta Environment and Parks has been available for comment yet this week, but commercial aquaculture facilities include fish hatcheries and trout ponds.

It's a $10 million industry in Alberta, according to a provincial government website.

Whirling disease — named after the circular swimming patterns of infected fish — was first confirmed in Johnson Lake in Banff National Park in August after a Parks Canada veterinarian saw a fish exhibiting symptoms earlier this year.

Since then, it has also been found in several locations in the Bow River in Banff National Park and now in what's believed to be a private fish hatchery.

Lesley Peterson, a fisheries biologist with Trout Unlimited, said it's concerning.

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CANADA: Whirling disease. August 2016 - ongoingemerging2016-09-14
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