Vaccination most effective control method of lumpy skin disease: EFSA

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BRUSSELS, Aug.10 (Xinhua) -- Vaccination of cattle is the most effective option for controlling the spread of lumpy skin disease, the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) has announced as one of the main findings of a scientific statement.

The research on the effectiveness of different options for controlling the spread of this economically damaging disease was requested by the European Commission, following the rapid spread of the disease in Greece, Bulgaria and other Balkan countries.

Lumpy skin disease is a viral disease that affects cattle and is transmitted by blood-feeding insects, such as certain species of flies and mosquitoes, or ticks.

EFSA experts said Tuesday that when vaccination is thoroughly applied, partial culling of affected animals is as effective in eradicating the disease as whole-herd culling, which is currently required under EU legislation.

In particular, vaccination is most effective if applied before the virus enters a region or a country. Therefore, experts recommend that vaccination is applied uniformly across all areas.

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Brussels, Brussels Capital, Belgium50.85°N 4.35°E0.426Yes
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Vaccination most effective control method of lumpy skin disease: EFSA
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BRUSSELS, Aug.10 (Xinhua) -- Vaccination of cattle is the most effective option for controlling the spread of lumpy skin disease, the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) has announced as one of the main findings of a scientific statement.

The research on the effectiveness of different options for controlling the spread of this economically damaging disease was requested by the European Commission, following the rapid spread of the disease in Greece, Bulgaria and other Balkan countries.

Lumpy skin disease is a viral disease that affects cattle and is transmitted by blood-feeding insects, such as certain species of flies and mosquitoes, or ticks.

EFSA experts said Tuesday that when vaccination is thoroughly applied, partial culling of affected animals is as effective in eradicating the disease as whole-herd culling, which is currently required under EU legislation.

In particular, vaccination is most effective if applied before the virus enters a region or a country. Therefore, experts recommend that vaccination is applied uniformly across all areas.

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