Ridgefield: Beetles are feasting on town’s ash trees | The Ridgefield Press

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A foliage-eating invader from Asia, the emerald ash borer, is damaging trees in Ridgefield, according to Tree Warden John Pinchbeck.

“Looks like we’ve got it. They’re dying from the top down, which is indicative of that disease,” he said.

The tree warden said he’d taken steps to protect several of the ash trees planted along Main Street’s during The Greening of Ridgefield 40 years ago.

“The trees we’ve been treating uptown are fine,” he said.

The town has treated six or seven ash trees planted along Main Street in the commercial village and also “a great big, old ash on Manor Road, which was part of the estate” to guard against the invasive beetles.

“We’ve been treating them for the last four or five years,” Pinchbeck said. “So far, so good …

“There’s 10 up at the high school, and we’re going to treat those,” he added.

The emerald ash borer, first noticed in the U.S. in 2002 in Michigan, has spread north into Canada, south to Tennessee, west to Minnesota and east to New York and now Connecticut.

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LocationCoordinatesRelevanceShow on map
Ridgefield, Connecticut, United States41.28°N 73.5°W0.250Yes
Michigan, United States44.25°N 85.5°W0.147No
Canada60.11°N 113.64°W0.145No
Tennessee, United States35.75°N 86.25°W0.142No
Minnesota, United States46.25°N 94.25°W0.134No
New York, New York, United States40.71°N 74.01°W0.133No
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Ridgefield: Beetles are feasting on town’s ash trees | The Ridgefield Press
Original text (summary): 

A foliage-eating invader from Asia, the emerald ash borer, is damaging trees in Ridgefield, according to Tree Warden John Pinchbeck.

“Looks like we’ve got it. They’re dying from the top down, which is indicative of that disease,” he said.

The tree warden said he’d taken steps to protect several of the ash trees planted along Main Street’s during The Greening of Ridgefield 40 years ago.

“The trees we’ve been treating uptown are fine,” he said.

The town has treated six or seven ash trees planted along Main Street in the commercial village and also “a great big, old ash on Manor Road, which was part of the estate” to guard against the invasive beetles.

“We’ve been treating them for the last four or five years,” Pinchbeck said. “So far, so good …

“There’s 10 up at the high school, and we’re going to treat those,” he added.

The emerald ash borer, first noticed in the U.S. in 2002 in Michigan, has spread north into Canada, south to Tennessee, west to Minnesota and east to New York and now Connecticut.

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IssueStatusStart
Emerald ash borer in the USA 2015-16ongoing2016-02-26
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