‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’, causal agent of Huanglongbing (citrus greening), detected in Asian citrus psyllids, Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae), in Colombia

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'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus', causal agent of Huanglongbing (citrus greening), detected in Asian citrus psyllids, Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae), in Colombia
Source: Instituto Colombiano Agropecuario
Event: Detection

In late 2015, the bacterium 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus', a causal agent of Huanglongbing (citrus greening), was detected in adult Asian citrus psyllids, Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae), infesting commercial and private Citrus sp. trees in Colombia. The pathogen has only been detected in the vector, D. citri, and not in citrus plants. Phytosanitary measures are being taken in an effort to prevent the spread of the pathogen.

'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' is native to Asia and also occurs in the Middle East, parts of Central and South America, the Caribbean, and the United States. In the United States, it is present in South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Louisiana, Texas, California, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands and is under official control to limit its spread. 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' severely affects Citrus spp. Both 'Ca. L. asiaticus' and D. citri are listed as reportable in the PEST ID database (queried 4/6/16), and 'Ca. L. asiaticus' is listed as a pest of concern on the 2015 PPQ Prioritized Offshore Pest List.
References:

1. ICA. 2015. Resolución 2390 de 2015, Diario Oficial No. 49.723 de 11 de diciembre de 2015. Instituto Colombiano Agropecuario (ICA). Last accessed April 7, 2016, from http://faolex.fao.org/docs/pdf/col151548.pdf.
2. EPPO. 2016. 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' detected in Diaphorina citri in Colombia. European and Mediterranean Plant Protection Organization (EPPO). March 1, 2016. Last accessed April 7, 2016, from http://archives.eppo.int/EPPOReporting/2016/Rse-1603.pdf.
Other PestLens articles about this pest:
'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus', causal agent of Huanglongbing (citrus greening), detected in Argentina
First reports of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus', causal agent of Huanglongbing (citrus greening), in Martinique, Guadeloupe, and Barbados
First report of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus', causal agent of Huanglongbing (citrus greening), in Paraguay
'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus', causal agent of Huanglongbing (citrus greening), eradicated from Argentina
First report of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus', causal agent of Huanglongbing (citrus greening), in Argentina
If you have any questions or comments for us about this article, please e-mail us at PestLens@aphis.usda.gov or log into the PestLens web system and click on "Contact Us" to submit your feedback.

First report of the thrips Hercinothrips dimidiatus (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) in the Netherlands
Source: National Plant Protection Organization of the Netherlands
Event: New Location

In October of 2015, female adults and larvae of the thrips Hercinothrips dimidiatus (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) were found infesting Aloe vera plants for planting in a production greenhouse in the Netherlands. This is the first report of H. dimidiatus in the Netherlands. A survey is planned to determine the distribution of the pest in the country.

Hercinothrips dimidiatus larvae feed and complete development on the upper surface of leaves, and adults feed on leaves and can also be found on the flowers. Feeding can result in discolored leaf spots, necrosis, and leaf death. Hercinothrips dimidiatus also infests Aloe arborescens (candelabra aloe) and has also been reported from Portugal and South Africa. It is not known to occur in the United States. Hercinothrips dimidiatus is not listed in the PEST ID database (queried 4/6/16).
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Tags
Locations
LocationCoordinatesRelevanceShow on map
Ethiopia9°N 39.5°E0.643Yes
South Africa29°S 24°E0.603No
United States39.76°N 98.5°W0.602No
Colombia4°N 73.25°W0.591No
Netherlands52.25°N 5.75°E0.589No
Argentina34°S 64°W0.458No
Kenya1°N 38°E0.425No
South Carolina, United States34°N 81°W0.381No
Puerto Rico18.25°N 66.5°W0.368No
Guadeloupe16.25°N 61.58°W0.361No
Cameroon6°N 12.5°E0.347No
Congo1°S 15.5°E0.346No
California, United States37.25°N 119.75°W0.342No
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PestLens Notification: Thursday, April 7, 2016
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The information in this notification is provided solely for the purpose of early warning and has not necessarily been confirmed with national plant protection organizations.
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Thursday, April 7, 2016 Notification

'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus', causal agent of Huanglongbing (citrus greening), detected in Asian citrus psyllids, Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae), in Colombia
Source: Instituto Colombiano Agropecuario
Event: Detection

In late 2015, the bacterium 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus', a causal agent of Huanglongbing (citrus greening), was detected in adult Asian citrus psyllids, Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae), infesting commercial and private Citrus sp. trees in Colombia. The pathogen has only been detected in the vector, D. citri, and not in citrus plants. Phytosanitary measures are being taken in an effort to prevent the spread of the pathogen.

'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' is native to Asia and also occurs in the Middle East, parts of Central and South America, the Caribbean, and the United States. In the United States, it is present in South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Louisiana, Texas, California, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands and is under official control to limit its spread. 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' severely affects Citrus spp. Both 'Ca. L. asiaticus' and D. citri are listed as reportable in the PEST ID database (queried 4/6/16), and 'Ca. L. asiaticus' is listed as a pest of concern on the 2015 PPQ Prioritized Offshore Pest List.
References:

1. ICA. 2015. Resolución 2390 de 2015, Diario Oficial No. 49.723 de 11 de diciembre de 2015. Instituto Colombiano Agropecuario (ICA). Last accessed April 7, 2016, from http://faolex.fao.org/docs/pdf/col151548.pdf.
2. EPPO. 2016. 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' detected in Diaphorina citri in Colombia. European and Mediterranean Plant Protection Organization (EPPO). March 1, 2016. Last accessed April 7, 2016, from http://archives.eppo.int/EPPOReporting/2016/Rse-1603.pdf.
Other PestLens articles about this pest:
'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus', causal agent of Huanglongbing (citrus greening), detected in Argentina
First reports of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus', causal agent of Huanglongbing (citrus greening), in Martinique, Guadeloupe, and Barbados
First report of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus', causal agent of Huanglongbing (citrus greening), in Paraguay
'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus', causal agent of Huanglongbing (citrus greening), eradicated from Argentina
First report of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus', causal agent of Huanglongbing (citrus greening), in Argentina
If you have any questions or comments for us about this article, please e-mail us at PestLens@aphis.usda.gov or log into the PestLens web system and click on "Contact Us" to submit your feedback.

First report of the thrips Hercinothrips dimidiatus (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) in the Netherlands
Source: National Plant Protection Organization of the Netherlands
Event: New Location

In October of 2015, female adults and larvae of the thrips Hercinothrips dimidiatus (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) were found infesting Aloe vera plants for planting in a production greenhouse in the Netherlands. This is the first report of H. dimidiatus in the Netherlands. A survey is planned to determine the distribution of the pest in the country.

Hercinothrips dimidiatus larvae feed and complete development on the upper surface of leaves, and adults feed on leaves and can also be found on the flowers. Feeding can result in discolored leaf spots, necrosis, and leaf death. Hercinothrips dimidiatus also infests Aloe arborescens (candelabra aloe) and has also been reported from Portugal and South Africa. It is not known to occur in the United States. Hercinothrips dimidiatus is not listed in the PEST ID database (queried 4/6/16).
References:

Issues
Issue(s) that this article relates to, if applicable.
IssueStatusStart
Huanglongbing in Central and South Americaongoing2014-08-14
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