New vegetable pest detected in Busselton - Busselton Dunsborough Mail

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The Department of Agriculture and Food has confirmed the detection of tomato potato psyllid on three commercial horticulture properties in Busselton, Yarloop and Gingin.

This is the first detection of the destructive insect pest outside of the quarantine zone covering the Perth metropolitan area.

Extensive surveillance and property inspections by the department has revealed the psyllid on a total of 43 properties, including 20 commercial properties. All but three are in the metropolitan area.

Department chief plant biosecurity officer John van Schagen said restrictions were in place for all infested premises to control the movement of host plants, produce and any associated material, such as horticultural equipment.

“These new detections in regional areas are in commercial eggplant, potato and capsicum crops,” he said.

“We are moving quickly to carry out more targeted surveillance in these areas to determine the spread of the psyllid and will continue to work closely with the WA horticulture industry to minimise its impact.

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Gingin, Australia31.35°S 115.9°E0.346Yes
Busselton, Australia33.65°S 115.35°E0.326Yes
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New vegetable pest detected in Busselton - Busselton Dunsborough Mail
Original text (summary): 

The Department of Agriculture and Food has confirmed the detection of tomato potato psyllid on three commercial horticulture properties in Busselton, Yarloop and Gingin.

This is the first detection of the destructive insect pest outside of the quarantine zone covering the Perth metropolitan area.

Extensive surveillance and property inspections by the department has revealed the psyllid on a total of 43 properties, including 20 commercial properties. All but three are in the metropolitan area.

Department chief plant biosecurity officer John van Schagen said restrictions were in place for all infested premises to control the movement of host plants, produce and any associated material, such as horticultural equipment.

“These new detections in regional areas are in commercial eggplant, potato and capsicum crops,” he said.

“We are moving quickly to carry out more targeted surveillance in these areas to determine the spread of the psyllid and will continue to work closely with the WA horticulture industry to minimise its impact.

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Tomato Potato Psyllidongoing2017-02-16
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