Invasive beetle kills ash trees in more towns; wasp species may control it

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The emerald ash borer, an invasive insect that is killing ash trees throughout the eastern U.S., is continuing to spread throughout New Hampshire, but there are hopes that two wasp species will bring it under control.

The New Hampshire Division of Forest and Lands has recently added Deerfield, Epsom, Gilford and Laconia to the list of towns where the beetle has been found. This makes more than three dozen communities which have been classified as infested areas since New Hampshire’s first EAB was spotted in Concord almost four years ago.

“Those recent towns are adjacent to already infested towns, which is pretty consistent with the spread of EAB,” said Bill Davidson, a forest health specialist with the Division of Forests and Lands.

“Towns that are infested are getting worse. There are areas in Concord where there are whole stands that have already died off or are going to be dead pretty soon, especially along the (Merrimack) River, along I-93,” he said.

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New Hampshire, United States43.67°N 71.5°W0.550Yes
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Invasive beetle kills ash trees in more towns; wasp species may control it
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The emerald ash borer, an invasive insect that is killing ash trees throughout the eastern U.S., is continuing to spread throughout New Hampshire, but there are hopes that two wasp species will bring it under control.

The New Hampshire Division of Forest and Lands has recently added Deerfield, Epsom, Gilford and Laconia to the list of towns where the beetle has been found. This makes more than three dozen communities which have been classified as infested areas since New Hampshire’s first EAB was spotted in Concord almost four years ago.

“Those recent towns are adjacent to already infested towns, which is pretty consistent with the spread of EAB,” said Bill Davidson, a forest health specialist with the Division of Forests and Lands.

“Towns that are infested are getting worse. There are areas in Concord where there are whole stands that have already died off or are going to be dead pretty soon, especially along the (Merrimack) River, along I-93,” he said.

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Emerald ash borer in the USA 2015-16ongoing2016-02-26
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