Genomics to Combat Shrimp Disease

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GLOBAL - White spot syndrome is one of the most serious diseases of farmed shrimp, and there is currently no effective way of combating this disease.

Scientists have recently discovered markers for genes that determine how well black tiger shrimp resist the disease. They are now planning to look for the genes in the white shrimp.

If the markers are used to breed shrimp that are more resistant to the disease, problems caused by the disease in the shrimp aquaculture industry will be significantly reduced.

The virus that causes white spot disease (WSSV) is capable of killing all the shrimp in a pond within 10 days of infection. The disease can, on occasions, totally devastate shrimp aquaculture in a complete region. There are currently no treatments available to effectively prevent outbreaks of the disease.

Indian and Norwegian scientists have been looking for a preventative solution in the shrimp genes. They have collaborated in the search for gene markers, which are locations in the genome, that code for the level of immunity the shrimps have against the virus.

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Norway60.47°N 8.47°E0.500Yes
India22°N 79°E0.349Yes
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Original title: 
Genomics to Combat Shrimp Disease
Original text (summary): 

GLOBAL - White spot syndrome is one of the most serious diseases of farmed shrimp, and there is currently no effective way of combating this disease.

Scientists have recently discovered markers for genes that determine how well black tiger shrimp resist the disease. They are now planning to look for the genes in the white shrimp.

If the markers are used to breed shrimp that are more resistant to the disease, problems caused by the disease in the shrimp aquaculture industry will be significantly reduced.

The virus that causes white spot disease (WSSV) is capable of killing all the shrimp in a pond within 10 days of infection. The disease can, on occasions, totally devastate shrimp aquaculture in a complete region. There are currently no treatments available to effectively prevent outbreaks of the disease.

Indian and Norwegian scientists have been looking for a preventative solution in the shrimp genes. They have collaborated in the search for gene markers, which are locations in the genome, that code for the level of immunity the shrimps have against the virus.

Issues
Issue(s) that this article relates to, if applicable.
IssueStatusStart
WSSV: A neo-emergence [February 2011 - ?]ongoing2010-10-16
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