Emerging emerald ash borer beetles found in Columbia County traps

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Emerging emerald ash borer beetles found in Columbia County traps
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Tamara Walkingstick, associate director of the Arkansas Forest Resource Center and associate professor of Forestry for the University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture, said the adult beetles will likely begin emerging in southern Arkansas immediately, and in central Arkansas in about one to two weeks.

“This is about the right time for their emergence, based on the amount of sunlight we’re getting now,” Walkingstick said. “For homeowners who were planning on treating their trees, hoping to kill the larvae, it may be too late for that.”

There are several visible signs homeowners should look for if they suspect they might have an infestation on their property: Signs of infestation include:

-- Multiple jagged holes excavated by woodpeckers feeding on ash borer larvae

-- Distinctive D-shaped exit holes left by emerging adult beetles

-- Canopy dieback from top of the tree

-- Sprouts arising from the base of the tree

-- Larval tunnels or galleries immediately under the bark of dying ash trees

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LocationCoordinatesRelevanceShow on map
Columbia, Arkansas, United States33.13°N 93.18°W0.604Yes
Dallas, Texas, United States32.78°N 96.81°W0.325No
Louisiana, United States32.48°N 92.15°W0.315No
Nevada, United States39.25°N 116.75°W0.273No
Wisconsin, United States43.47°N 89.33°W0.269No
Georgia, United States34.83°N 83.99°W0.269No
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Emerging emerald ash borer beetles found in Columbia County traps
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Tamara Walkingstick, associate director of the Arkansas Forest Resource Center and associate professor of Forestry for the University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture, said the adult beetles will likely begin emerging in southern Arkansas immediately, and in central Arkansas in about one to two weeks.

“This is about the right time for their emergence, based on the amount of sunlight we’re getting now,” Walkingstick said. “For homeowners who were planning on treating their trees, hoping to kill the larvae, it may be too late for that.”

There are several visible signs homeowners should look for if they suspect they might have an infestation on their property: Signs of infestation include:

-- Multiple jagged holes excavated by woodpeckers feeding on ash borer larvae

-- Distinctive D-shaped exit holes left by emerging adult beetles

-- Canopy dieback from top of the tree

-- Sprouts arising from the base of the tree

-- Larval tunnels or galleries immediately under the bark of dying ash trees

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Issue(s) that this article relates to, if applicable.
IssueStatusStart
Emerald ash borer in the USA 2015-16ongoing2016-02-26
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