Emerald Ash Borer Continues to Wreak Havoc: 2016 Update - Tree Services Magazine

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The destructive path of the emerald ash borer (EAB) is still diminishing the nation’s supply of ash trees.

As of last month, EAB had been confirmed in 25 U.S. states (Arkansas, Colorado, Connecticut, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin) and two Canadian provinces (Ontario and Quebec).

Currently, states in the Midwest like Illinois and Wisconsin are being hit hard.

The federal government says that ash is the most commonly planted tree in new residential and commercial developments, and that it makes up 20 to 40 percent of the landscape ecosystem in the Midwest.

So far, EAB has killed tens of millions of ash trees and threatens to kill most of the 7 billion ash trees throughout North America. It’s estimated that the borer will have caused more than $10 billion in economic damage by 2019, and EAB is the most destructive forest pest ever seen in North America.

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LocationCoordinatesRelevanceShow on map
Illinois, United States40°N 89.25°W0.495Yes
Aurora, Illinois, United States41.76°N 88.32°W0.464No
Wisconsin, United States44.5°N 90°W0.289No
United States39.76°N 98.5°W0.236No
New Hampshire, United States43.67°N 71.5°W0.233No
North Carolina, United States35.5°N 80°W0.232No
Arkansas, United States34.75°N 92.5°W0.232No
New Jersey, United States40.17°N 74.5°W0.230No
New York, United States43°N 75.5°W0.227No
West Virginia, United States38.5°N 80.5°W0.225No
Virginia, United States37.55°N 77.45°W0.219No
Connecticut, United States41.67°N 72.67°W0.213No
Louisiana, United States31°N 92°W0.213No
Iowa, United States42°N 93.5°W0.213No
Kentucky, United States38.2°N 84.88°W0.212No
Kansas, United States38.5°N 98.5°W0.212No
Missouri, United States38.25°N 92.5°W0.211No
Indiana, United States40°N 86.25°W0.211No
Maryland, United States39°N 76.75°W0.211No
Minnesota, United States46.25°N 94.25°W0.211No
Colorado, United States39°N 105.5°W0.211No
Massachusetts, United States42.37°N 71.11°W0.211No
Tennessee, United States35.75°N 86.25°W0.210No
Michigan, United States44.25°N 85.5°W0.210No
Pennsylvania, United States40.27°N 76.91°W0.209No
Ohio, United States40.25°N 83°W0.209No
Canada52°N 72°W0.204No
Georgia, United States32.75°N 83.5°W0.194No
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Emerald Ash Borer Continues to Wreak Havoc: 2016 Update - Tree Services Magazine
Original text (summary): 

The destructive path of the emerald ash borer (EAB) is still diminishing the nation’s supply of ash trees.

As of last month, EAB had been confirmed in 25 U.S. states (Arkansas, Colorado, Connecticut, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin) and two Canadian provinces (Ontario and Quebec).

Currently, states in the Midwest like Illinois and Wisconsin are being hit hard.

The federal government says that ash is the most commonly planted tree in new residential and commercial developments, and that it makes up 20 to 40 percent of the landscape ecosystem in the Midwest.

So far, EAB has killed tens of millions of ash trees and threatens to kill most of the 7 billion ash trees throughout North America. It’s estimated that the borer will have caused more than $10 billion in economic damage by 2019, and EAB is the most destructive forest pest ever seen in North America.

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Issue(s) that this article relates to, if applicable.
IssueStatusStart
Emerald ash borer in the USA 2015-16ongoing2016-02-26
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