Emerald ash borer confirmed in village of Pewaukee

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They're here, Pewaukee.

Emerald ash borers, the ash tree-killing beetles first found in Wisconsin in 2008 near Newburg, now have been confirmed in both the city and village of Pewaukee.

In the village, the detection of the metallic green beetle took place June 3 on Sunnyridge Road, just south of Capitol Drive, said Bill McNee, Department of Natural Resources forest health specialist for Southeastern Wisconsin.

Four months earlier, EAB was confirmed in the city of Pewaukee on Woodstream Court near Wagner Park.

The message for Pewaukee homeowners, said McNee, is to consider treating their ash trees — either by doing it themselves or hiring a tree service. He said ash trees not treated have a 99 percent mortality rate from EAB.

Put a different way, homeowners have a decision to make, said Ken Ottman, president and owner of First Choice Tree Care in Mequon.

Treat the tree and save it. Or cut it down.

 

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Pewaukee, Wisconsin, United States43.08°N 88.26°W0.789Yes
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Emerald ash borer confirmed in village of Pewaukee
Original text (summary): 

They're here, Pewaukee.

Emerald ash borers, the ash tree-killing beetles first found in Wisconsin in 2008 near Newburg, now have been confirmed in both the city and village of Pewaukee.

In the village, the detection of the metallic green beetle took place June 3 on Sunnyridge Road, just south of Capitol Drive, said Bill McNee, Department of Natural Resources forest health specialist for Southeastern Wisconsin.

Four months earlier, EAB was confirmed in the city of Pewaukee on Woodstream Court near Wagner Park.

The message for Pewaukee homeowners, said McNee, is to consider treating their ash trees — either by doing it themselves or hiring a tree service. He said ash trees not treated have a 99 percent mortality rate from EAB.

Put a different way, homeowners have a decision to make, said Ken Ottman, president and owner of First Choice Tree Care in Mequon.

Treat the tree and save it. Or cut it down.

"Literally every ash tree in Southeast Wisconsin that is not treated will be killed by this insect," Ottman said. "It's a voracious, effective killer. It's the worst thing that I've ever seen. It's worse than Dutch elm disease."

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Emerald ash borer in the USA 2015-16ongoing2016-02-26
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