Brazilian citrus at risk from The Helicoverpa armigera

Details
Alert
Alert sent: 
Yes
Sites: 
PH
Channel: 
Industry
Text (summary): 

The Helicoverpa armigera caterpillar is causing great damage in many crops in Brazil. It has already been detected in cotton, soybean, tomato, beans, wheat, and in some weeds.

The Citrus Defence Fund (Fundecitrus) reported that, although no official statement had been made, the caterpillar had also been seen in citrus plants in Goiás, Brazil, state where the plague was officially identified in other plantations.

The entity explained that once it was a moth, the Helicoverpa armigera could fly up to a thousand kilometres in three days. It also has a great capacity for reproduction and survival, as well as the potential of developing resistance to insecticides and easily adapting to different environments, climates and farming systems.

According to the Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation (Embrapa), the Helicoverpa armigera was first detected in Brazil in 2012 and, so far, has caused losses close to 2,000 million reais ($ 858 million dollars).

Tags
Locations
LocationCoordinatesZoomRelevanceShow on map
Brazil
10°S 55°W
1
0.409
Yes
São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
23.5475°S 46.6361°W
1
0.301
No
Goiás, Goias, Brazil
15.9344°S 50.1403°W
1
0.259
No
Mapa, Madagascar
19.55°S 46.0167°E
1
0.184
No
Bahia, Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil
3.55°S 40.2433°W
1
0.157
No
Paraná, Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil
6.48639°S 38.3131°W
1
0.145
No
Discovery
Discoveries: 
Discovery method: 
Robot discovered
Discovery time: 
Tue 2013-Dec-24 00:10
URL: 
Discovery method: 
Robot discovered
Discovery time: 
Tue 2013-Dec-24 00:50
URL: 
Original language: 
Original title: 
Brazilian citrus at risk from The Helicoverpa armigera
Original text (summary): 

The Helicoverpa armigera caterpillar is causing great damage in many crops in Brazil. It has already been detected in cotton, soybean, tomato, beans, wheat, and in some weeds.

The Citrus Defence Fund (Fundecitrus) reported that, although no official statement had been made, the caterpillar had also been seen in citrus plants in Goiás, Brazil, state where the plague was officially identified in other plantations.

The entity explained that once it was a moth, the Helicoverpa armigera could fly up to a thousand kilometres in three days. It also has a great capacity for reproduction and survival, as well as the potential of developing resistance to insecticides and easily adapting to different environments, climates and farming systems.

According to the Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation (Embrapa), the Helicoverpa armigera was first detected in Brazil in 2012 and, so far, has caused losses close to 2,000 million reais ($ 858 million dollars).