Ash borer spread could hit olive trees in U.S. - Journal-News - Hamilton Journal News

Details
Promoted
Sites: 
IBIS PH
Author: 
Chris Stewart Staff Writer 3:25 p.m Wednesday
Channel: 
Search engines
Text (summary): 

Cipollini, a biology professor, is careful to not overstate the alarm to olive growers, but the ash borer is now found to have naturally infested another ash relative, the white fringetree, an ornamental that grows in Ohio and elsewhere. That revelation came as a surprise when Cipollini made that discovery in 2014, he said.

In the Mediterranean, fruit fly blight and “olive tree leprosy” sent 2014 production down 35 percent in Italy — the second largest producer after Spain. A drought that same summer in Spain caused a disastrous harvest there. Due to the shortage from the two countries that together produce 70 percent of the world’s olives, Europeans paid on average 19.8 percent more for olive oil during much of 2015, according to analysts. Prices are still volatile now that the “leprosy,” Xylella fastidiosa, is wreaking havoc in Spain.

Tags
Locations
LocationCoordinatesRelevanceShow on map
California, United States37.25°N 119.75°W0.490Yes
Ohio, United States40.25°N 83°W0.359No
Australia25°S 135°E0.355No
Italy42.83°N 12.83°E0.347No
Arizona, United States34.5°N 111.5°W0.320No
New Mexico, United States34.5°N 106°W0.299No
Texas, United States31.25°N 99.25°W0.297No
Oregon, United States44°N 120.5°W0.291No
Georgia, United States32.75°N 83.5°W0.264No
Florida, United States28.75°N 82.5°W0.259No
Discovery
Source: 
Searched entity: 
Original language: 
Original title: 
Ash borer spread could hit olive trees in U.S. - Journal-News - Hamilton Journal News
Original text (summary): 

Cipollini, a biology professor, is careful to not overstate the alarm to olive growers, but the ash borer is now found to have naturally infested another ash relative, the white fringetree, an ornamental that grows in Ohio and elsewhere. That revelation came as a surprise when Cipollini made that discovery in 2014, he said.

In the Mediterranean, fruit fly blight and “olive tree leprosy” sent 2014 production down 35 percent in Italy — the second largest producer after Spain. A drought that same summer in Spain caused a disastrous harvest there. Due to the shortage from the two countries that together produce 70 percent of the world’s olives, Europeans paid on average 19.8 percent more for olive oil during much of 2015, according to analysts. Prices are still volatile now that the “leprosy,” Xylella fastidiosa, is wreaking havoc in Spain.

Issues
Issue(s) that this article relates to, if applicable.
IssueStatusStart
Emerald ash borer in the USA 2015-16ongoing2016-02-26
Workflow
Status: