Armyworm invasion continues: Crop-eating pest has now plagued 20 African countries - International Business Times UK

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Ghana is the latest country in Africa to experience an invasion of a crop-eating pest known as "fall armyworm" (FAW). The country's Agriculture Minister asked parliament earlier in May to declare a state of emergency as the invasion is threatening a $133m (£102m, €121m) project, meant to boost the country's food production and create jobs in the agriculture sector, according to reports.

Armyworms are caterpillars native to North and South America. They were first recorded as an invasive species in Africa in early 2016. Their name derives from their eating habit, as they march through crops devastating entire harvests.

In February, the UN Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) held an emergency meeting over the invasion, fearing that the number of countries affected would increase.

The number of African countries that have been invaded stands now at 20, with experts warning the armyworm would cause damage worth about $3bn to Africa's maize crop in the next 12 months.

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Armyworm invasion continues: Crop-eating pest has now plagued 20 African countries - International Business Times UK
Original text (summary): 

Ghana is the latest country in Africa to experience an invasion of a crop-eating pest known as "fall armyworm" (FAW). The country's Agriculture Minister asked parliament earlier in May to declare a state of emergency as the invasion is threatening a $133m (£102m, €121m) project, meant to boost the country's food production and create jobs in the agriculture sector, according to reports.

Armyworms are caterpillars native to North and South America. They were first recorded as an invasive species in Africa in early 2016. Their name derives from their eating habit, as they march through crops devastating entire harvests.

In February, the UN Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) held an emergency meeting over the invasion, fearing that the number of countries affected would increase.

The number of African countries that have been invaded stands now at 20, with experts warning the armyworm would cause damage worth about $3bn to Africa's maize crop in the next 12 months.

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